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Call for Symposia Proposals

Don’t miss the opportunity to submit your symposium proposal to the Meeting!

The Psychonomic Society and the Scientific Committee invites you to contribute by submitting a proposal for a symposium in any of the main topics of the Meeting. The following guidelines have been established to clarify the procedures for symposium proposals.

Who can submit a symposium proposals ?

All 2015 Members, Fellows, Emeritus Members, and Associate Members, of Psychonomics, SEPEX and ESCoP may submit symposium abstracts for the International Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Non-members of Psychonomics SEPEX, ESCoP may also submit abstracts. Students are not allowed to submit symposium abstracts. Due to time and space limitations, there are a limited number of abstracts that will be accepted from non-members. (please check selection criteria below)

SYMPOSIUM PROPOSALS SUBMISSION IS CLOSED

Guidelines for Symposia Submissions

A symposium is considered to be a 1.5- to 2-hour session consisting of 4, 5 or 6 twenty minute contributions, one of which may be a discussion session.

Your symposium proposal should include:

  • symposium title.
  • The scientific topic in which your proposal fits best. Check the list of the topics here.
  • A brief description by the convener and consists of a 250-word abstract describing the purpose and the theme of the symposium, the list of the speakers and the title of their talks. Each speaker should also provide a 250-word abstract.
  • It is required that you name in your proposal a chair (perhaps yourself) who has agreed to be responsible for the event and speakers.

Selection criteria

  • Scientific quality, future impact and recent scientific breakthroughs and/or highlights.
  • The global structure of the scientific program of the meeting and the spread over the topics to be covered.
  • Priority will be given to abstracts submitted by Fellows and Full Members of the societies. If all Fellows and Full members can be accommodated in spoken sessions, priority for remaining speaking opportunities is assigned first to Members, then to non-members holding PhDs, and, in rare cases, to Student Members.
    Please take note Emeritus and Honorary members are considered as full member.
Dates to Remember
  • Extended Deadline for Symposia submissions:
    15th October 2015
    .
  • Notice of results to the proposer: 
    15th December 2015

Microsoft_Word_logoIt is compulsory to use this template to submit your proposal of a Symposium.

This template will be required at the end of the submission process.

info2If you need more information or you have questions about submission of a Symposium, please contact: ps2016@kenes.com

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Hotel Monasterio de los Basilios ***

   

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Address: Paseo de los Basilios, 2, 18008 Granada

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SINGLE Room 85,00€
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Hotel Santos Saray ****

   

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Address: Calle Profesor Enrique Tierno Galván, 4, 18006 Granada

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Hotel Meliá Granada ****

   

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Address: Calle Ángel Ganivet, 7, 18009 Granada

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SINGLE Room 109,00€
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Hotel Andalucia Center ****

   

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Address: Avenida de América, 3, 18006 Granada, Granada

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SINGLE Room 125,00€
DOUBLE Room 140,00€
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Hotel Vincci Albaycin ****

   

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Address: Carrera de la Virgen, 48, 18005 Granada, Granada

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DOUBLE Room 150,00€
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Address: Calle Acera del Darro, 62, 18005 Granada, Granada

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Eldar Shafir

 

Abstract

The Psychology of Scarcity and Its Consequences

This talk will review research around the psychology that emerges in contexts of scarcity, and the decisions — occasionally commendable, often problematic — that ensue.  Some implications for thinking about scarcity (esp. poverty) and for policy will be considered.

 

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Judith Kroll

 

Abstract

Two languages in mind:  Bilingualism as a lens to cognition

More people in the world are bilingual than monolingual. Yet, until recently, bilingualism was considered to be a complicating factor for modeling language processing, language learning, and the cognitive resources that support them. In the past two decades, there has been an upsurge of research on the consequences of bilingual language experience for cognition and the brain. In this talk, I present evidence that suggests that the interactions that arise when two languages are in play reveal mechanisms of cognitive control that may be difficult or impossible to examine in monolingual speakers. In this sense, bilingualism becomes a lens to cognition.

 

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Eleanor Maquire

 

Abstract

MaGuire_EleanorThe what, where, when, why and how of memory

Memory is undeniably central to cognition. And yet, there is still a pervasive tendency to examine memory in isolation. By considering why memory exists, what it is for, how and where memories are built and if and when they change over time, I will argue that memory can only be properly understood if considered in the context of cognition as a whole. I will examine cognitive, neuropsychological and brain imaging data to explore this assertion.

 

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John Duncan

Abstract

Duncan_JohnFrontoparietal control systems in the assembly of cognitive episodes

All human cognition is controlled in a series of attentional episodes, breaking complex problems into simpler, more solvable sub-problems. In human fMRI studies, a common or multiple-demand (MD) pattern of frontal and parietal activity is associated with diverse cognitive demands, and with standard tests of fluid intelligence. Based on behavioural, neuropsychological, fMRI and single unit data, I suggest that the core function of MD cortex is to control complex cognition in a structured sequence of attentional episodes. At the same time, I consider the complementary control functions of MD and “default mode” networks

 

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